Posts Tagged ‘nutrition’

vegetarian athletes

vegetarian athletes

vegetarian athletes

If you are an athlete or just sports or simply heavy things how can you be a vegetarian?

Such as a basketball player or boxing, which involves a lot of cardio woulndt force unless you lose, because that's what I think? (Dont flame me for saying this or anything I know that some say that what I say, it would not be 100% right and that's why I'm asking and my way here and now to emphasize here)

An athlete should know about nutrition ... course, that's where the hang here. You're running a stereotype that vegetarians and vegans are weak things, little thin ... is not true. A vegetarian, vegan, and even the diet can easily provide the nutrition that the demand for bodies active. There are many vegetarian and vegan athletes and others. Be Vegetarian the top of my head is Ricky Williams, who is back very good running (mostly related to the Miami Dolphins, but played on other computers briefly). Yes, a professional football player who does not eat meat. Certainly, it would not accuse someone who plays in the NFL to be weak, right? Tony Gonzalez, who plays for the Atlanta Falcons tight end, lives a mostly vegan diet (you eat fish and chicken strange, but otherwise follows a vegetarian diet). Mac Danzig is a vegan MMA fighter. Someone who makes a living out of beating people in the octagon is not someone who has lost strength in your diet based in vegetables! Check out these guys: http://veganbodybuilding.com/profile_avi_3.jpg http://veganbodybuilding.com/profile_ryan_5.jpg http://veganbodybuilding.com/profile_robert_4.jpg http://veganbodybuilding.com/profile_alex_2.jpg What do they all have in common? Are VEGAN! If you are confused as to how people can live without meat, just shoot me an email. :) EDIT: What, Tri! I'm sure you will find a question and answer in front of me ... I am in the work right now, hehe:)

Compare______________________________________________________


The Vegetarian Sports Nutrition Guide (Paperback)


The Vegetarian Sports Nutrition Guide (Paperback)


$11.28


Exercise, train, and compete at your best on a vegetarian diet. Few segments of the population are more mindful of their food intake than athletes and vegetarians. This book combines the unique demands of sports with a healthy vegetarian diet...

Fresh at Home (Paperback)


Fresh at Home (Paperback)


$15.9


Fresh at Home is a deliciously healthy book filled with innovative vegetarian recipes-rice bowls and noodles, sandwiches and wraps, soups, salads, energy elixirs, and pro-athletic shakes-that have defined the Toronto-based restaurant Fresh/Juice...

Compare______________________________________________________


Tofu 123 : Taking the Mystery Out of the Big White Blob Featuring Maribeth Abrams with Special Guest, Olympic Athlete - Carl Lewis


Tofu 123 : Taking the Mystery Out of the Big White Blob Featuring Maribeth Abrams with Special Guest, Olympic Athlete - Carl Lewis


$4.69


Its easy to make scrumptious dishes using tofu. If you know how! Join Olympic track and field star Carl Lewis and Chef Maribeth Abrams on this mouth-watering adventure into the wonderful world of tofu! What kind to buy! How to open it! What to do with it so that diners beg for more! Thats what Tofu 1.2.3 is about, and youll get a hearty dose of laughter along with the most useful information on ho...

Element Bars Energy Bars, Choco-lata-fun, Walnuts & Chocolate Chips, 2.0 Ounce (Pack of 12)


Element Bars Energy Bars, Choco-lata-fun, Walnuts & Chocolate Chips, 2.0 Ounce (Pack of 12)


$23.88


Our Element Bars are made with whole food ingredients that are carefully handpicked and kept as nature intended. We hand make our bars using quality ingredients, bake them in our ovens and deliver them freshly baked from our ovens to your door. You can also visit ElementBars.com and create your own custom energy bar by selecting from all natural and organic ingredients and then naming your unique ...

NOW Foods Tribulus 1000mg  45% Extract


NOW Foods Tribulus 1000mg 45% Extract



...


Account limit of 2000 requests per hour exceeded.
[phpzon]vegetarian athletes, 2,Books[/phpzon] [phpzon]vegetarian athletes, 2,Grocery[/phpzon]

Vegetarian Race driver Leilani Munter for Athletes Go Green



eBay Logo  

Compare______________________________________________________


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


$13.00


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


$13.00


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


$13.00


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


$13.00


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


$13.00


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


$15.00


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


$15.00


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


$15.00


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


$15.00


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


$15.00


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


$15.00


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


$11.00


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


$11.00


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


$11.00


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


$11.00


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


$11.00


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


$11.00


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


$11.00


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


$11.00


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


Meat Free Athlete T-Shirt 4 Vegan ARA Vegetarian


$11.00


Immunity and The Athlete

SPORTS NUTRITION © Patricia Niland 2005

To realise potential, it is vital that an athlete has the
ability to train consistently. Successful training, over time,
builds a stronger, faster, more efficient body which will
hopefully go on to produce optimum athletic performances. Time
lost due to ill health, is time that a competitive athlete
cannot afford to lose. In the long term the athlete and his/her
coach needs to be conscientious about their own ‘care' and
acknowledge that they have a responsibility for the training and
nutrition factors within their control, both of which can
influence success or failure.

Illness can have profound effects on an athletes mental
perspective, causing loss of rythym and habit. Once recovered
the athlete may need to mentally regain focus. Maintaining a
healthy immune system is therefore a considerable factor in the
athletes pursuit of success.

Moderate exercise has been demonstrated to have beneficial
effects on the immune system, reducing the risk of colds and
chest infections. However for the competitive athlete who trains
at a greater intensity and for longer durations, intensive
exercise has the potential to cause immune suppression, with a
recognised window of lowered post exercise immunity existing
where the athletes system is vulnerable to infection (Nieman
2003).

Post-exercise immune suppression is thought to be partly due to
the increase in production of stress hormones such as cortisol
and adrenaline. Athletes training or competing in a
carbohydrate-depleted state, will experience a greater increase
in these hormones. It is therefore suggested that the ingestion
of 30-60g carbohydrate per hour by athletes, during intensive
exercise can create a reduction in stress and immune markers.
(Gleeson et al 2004)

Reduction in immune status also occurs when an athlete has
compromised glycogen and fat stores. This can be caused by the
ineffective replacement of calories after exercise, or a
conscious avoidance of fat. Calorific expenditure should
therefore be balanced by an equivalent intake of calories, and
the consumption of essential fats become more commonplace. When
the diet shows signs of nutrient deficiencies, supplementation
should be utilised to provide protection. However care should be
taken not to overcompensate and the diet should always be viewed
as the main provider of nutrients. (Venkatraman et al 2002)

Training alone is not responsible for the suppression of the
immune system. Neiman identifies many factors that can
contribute and should be considered

Diet Training and competition Family/relationships Work Travel
Rest Boost immunity and train consistently Optimum nutrition,
should be the fundamental consistent factor for any athlete.
When training schedules are planned, time should always be taken
to plan an appropriate dietary programme. This should be
specific to the individuals training and competition
requirements. Revisions in training intensity, increases or
decreases, should always merit revisions to the diet.

DIETARY RULES

Fats Saturated fats and trans/hydrogenated fats are not
essential to the body and should be avoided as they suppress
immunity and inhibit the function of essential fats. However the
essential fats Omega 3, 6 and 9 are vital for the athlete as
they enhance cell membrane integrity, increasing metabolism and
immunity. Emphasis should be given to _3's. AVOID: Margarine
(hydrogenated fats) Processed foods and foods high in saturated
fats INCREASE: Nuts - Brazil, almond, walnut, pecan, hazelnut.
Seeds and their oils - pumpkin, sunflower, sesame, hemp, flax
Oily fish - Mackerel, herring etc

Carbohydrates Refined carbohydrates (white rice and bread)
should be substituted for whole grains, ie. wholemeal bread and
brown rice, both for their nutrient and fibre content. Large
amounts of refined sugar should be avoided due to its immune
suppression potential.

Fruit and vegetable intake should be around 7-10 portions per
day. Organic produce is preferable and when possible vegetables
should be consumed raw to increase vitamin, phyto-chemicals and
enzyme content.

Protein Vegetarian athletes should ensure they are consistently
taking in high quality protein (see below). When the athlete is
not vegetarian, the increase/inclusion of vegetarian protein
would be beneficial. INCLUDE MORE: Beans, pulses, tofu and
quinoa, cheese (goats), eggs (with _3's), oily fish AVOID:
Proteins high in saturated fats, red meats and processed meats
ie. burgers and sausages GENERAL RULES Stress Athletes need to
acknowledge stress and the role it can play in performance and
immunity. Priorities must to be identified, taking into
consideration all other life factors (see previous page).
Realistic, attainable goals can then be created, enabling the
athlete to train and compete whilst keeping stress levels to a
minimum.

Pulse test To check for over training/infection — this should be
done every morning before rising. Take the pulse. A rise of 8
beats or above from the average for the preceding week, would
signal that athlete should reduce training.

Sleep Quality sleep is essential.

Factors which suppress or inhibit immunity High intake of
dietary fats (saturated and trans fats) Compromised glycogen and
fuel depletion Training >90 minutes Over training Weight loss
Stress Lack of sleep Deficiency of dietary protein Deficiency of
vitamins A, C, E, B6 and B12 and the minerals iron, zinc,
selenium and copper

Reading Nieman DC. Current perspective on exercise immunology.
Curr Sports Med Rep. 2003 Oct;2(5):239-42. Gleeson M, Nieman DC,
Pedersen BK. Exercise, nutrition and immune function. J Sports
Sci. 2004 Jan;22(1):115-25. Venkatraman JT, Pendergast DR.
Effect of dietary intake on immune function in athletes. Sports
Med. 2002;32(5):323-37. Gleeson M, Lancaster GI, Bishop NC.
Nutritional strategies to minimise exercise-induced
immunosuppression in athletes. Can J Appl Physiol. 2001;26
Suppl:S23-35

About the Author

Patricia Niland is a Nutritional Therapist who prepares personal
programmes for individuals and athletes to enhance their health,
wellbeing and performance.

To contact email - UKfoodguru@aol.com

Compare______________________________________________________


The Complete Vegetarian


The Complete Vegetarian


$25.41


Citing health concerns as the number one reason why people adopt a vegetarian diet, this collection makes important scientific connections between good health and vegetarianism. The Complete Vegetarian examines the diet’s impact on chronic diseases and serves as a nutritional guide and meal-planning resource. Leading vegetarian nutritionists and medical doctors devote entire chapters to nutritional aspects that include fats, protein, and fiber; to diseases such as diabetes, cancer, heart disease, and high blood pressure; and to vegetarian meal planning, including specialized diets for children, pregnant women, and athletes.   The contributors` cutting-edge research finds that it is not only an absence of meat that accounts for the health effects of a vegetarian diet; other contributing factors include less saturated fat and more fiber, antioxidants, and unsaturated fats than other diets. The Complete Vegetarian promises to be an essential resource for health professionals and the growing number of people who have adopted or are thinking about adopting a vegetarian lifestyle.   Contributors include John J. B. Anderson, Dina Aronson, Peggy Carlson, James Craner, Brenda Davis, Simon K. Emms, Jeanene Fogli, Suzanne Havala Hobbs, Michael A. Klaper, Erin L. Kraker, Valerie Kurtzhalts, D. Enette Larson-Meyer, Reed Mangels, Carol M. Meerschaert, Virginia Messina, Mary Helen Niemeyer, Carl V. Phillips, Sudha Raj, and Cheryl Sullivan.